2009 Waterfowl Survey

mandarin_duckHow about some positive news on the waterfowl front.  Here are some highlights from the 2009 Waterfowl Survey covering the north-central United States, south-central and northern Canada, and Alaska:

-The estimated mallard population is 8.5 million birds, a 10 percent increase over last year’s estimate of 7.7 million birds and 13 percent above the long-term average.

-The estimated population of 3.1 million gadwall is similar to last year’s estimate and 73 percent above the long-term average.

-At 7.4 million, the estimated population size of blue-winged teal is the second highest on record, while green-winged teal numbers were at an all-time high of 3.4 million. Estimates for both species are well above their long-term averages (60 percent and 79 percent, respectively).

-The 3.2 million estimate for northern pintails is 23 percent more than last year but 20 percent below the long-term average.

-The estimated number of one million redheads is similar to last year and is 62 percent above the long-term average.

-The canvasback estimate of 662,000 is 35 percent more than last year’s estimate and similar to the long-term average.

-The estimated abundance of northern shovelers (4.4 million) is 25 percent more than last year and 92 percent above the long-term average.

-The scaup (lesser and greater combined), estimate of 4.2 million, is 12 percent greater than last year but 18 percent below the long-term average.

Data: U.S. FWS, Trends in Duck Breeding Populations, 1955-2009

About The Author

Scott serves as Director of Development & Communications for Audubon Canyon Ranch (focusing on preservation, education and conservation science) and has almost fifteen years of experience spanning for-profit and nonprofit sectors in biotech, wildlife conservation and management, communications, and philanthropy. In addition to a strong track record in organizational growth and leadership, he is the founder of Urban Bird Foundation and Burrowing Owl Conservation Network, and presided over ECHO Fund, a coastal protection and restoration organization, as President for four years. Scott holds an M.A. in Environmental Studies with a concentration in Sustainable Development and Policy, degrees in Micro & Molecular Biology and Environmental Sciences, and has complemented his studies with a Master's certificate in Environmental Resource Management.

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